The Latest

Jul 30, 2014 / 16,331 notes
alalae:

hoping this is a metaphor
Jul 27, 2014 / 107,764 notes

alalae:

hoping this is a metaphor

(via plantsandvogue)

Jul 27, 2014 / 50,830 notes

(via sexpectinq)

Jul 27, 2014 / 398,469 notes

5by5kevin:

Roses are red
And true love is rare
Booty booty booty booty
Rockin’ everywhere

(via asvprock)

Jul 27, 2014 / 190,757 notes

yusterday:

I identify w tinkerbell a lot because she needs attention or she dies and that’s pretty much me

(via werner-norton)

Jul 25, 2014 / 486,778 notes

(via chronicslut)

Jul 25, 2014 / 28,182 notes
Jul 25, 2014 / 182,945 notes

(via departured)

Jul 25, 2014 / 3,438 notes

(via andehpandeh)

treerings-sing:

This is perfect.
Jul 25, 2014 / 128,981 notes

treerings-sing:

This is perfect.

(via ruby-brown)

Jul 25, 2014 / 29,369 notes

(via pure-wonders)

Jul 25, 2014 / 405,279 notes

(via sexpectinq)

Jul 25, 2014 / 404,535 notes

phobias:

avoiding hate like

image

(via trust)

Jul 24, 2014 / 578,124 notes

wilddaize:

I’m a hopeless romantic with a dirty mind who has high standards. 

(via trust)

Jul 24, 2014 / 968,512 notes

latteinparis:

thedevilswaiting:

The original story of the little mermaid is that she must kill the prince in order to be human, and in the end, she loves him too much and kills herself instead.

The artwork is too great not to reblog. 

Ok, ok - important expansion: she only has to kill the Prince because the deal was if he fell in love with her she could be human forever, and he didn’t. By which I mean, he was a good person and genuinely nice to her, but he didn’t fall in love. He fell in love with someone else, also perfectly nice - not the seawitch in disguise, fu Disney. The Mermaid is told she can only return to the sea now if she kills the Prince. She goes into the room where he and his lover lie sleeping and they look so beautiful and happy together that she can’t do it.

That’s why she kills herself. And because it was a noble act she returns to sea as foam.

One moral of the story was that women shouldn’t fundamentally change who they are for love of a man, and in theory Han Christian Anderson wrote it for a ballerina with whom he fell in love. She was marrying someone else who wouldn’t let her dance.

(via princessswho)